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How To Enrol To Vote

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Contributor:
elections.org.nz
elections.org.nz

Enrolling to vote is easy. You will not be able to vote if you are not enrolled before election day.  It is compulsory to be enrolled if you are qualified, although voting is optional.

Can I enrol online?

Yes, simply click "Enrol, check or update" to enrol or update your details and we'll either send you the printed copy, or you can download your own, to check, sign and send back. 

Can I enrol using a printed form?

Yes, you download the form or you can pick up an enrolment form called "Enrolling to vote: Application" from your nearest New Zealand PostShop which you can fill in and leave at the counter or send back freepost.  Or, phone us
free on 0800 ENROL NOW (0800 36 76 56) or send your name and address to Freetext 3676, and we will post the form out to you.

What information do I need to give?

Please
answer all questions on the enrolment form so we can enrol you correctly. Only your name, residential address and occupation will be printed in the electoral roll.

Your Full Name

This is needed to check that you've enrolled correctly, and to distinguish people with the same or similar names.

Date of Birth

This shows your registrar of electors that you are old enough to enrol and
can also help us distinguish between people with the same name.

Signature and Date

If you are a New Zealand Māori, or a descendant of a New Zealand Māori, you must sign and date in either the Māori panel or the General panel. You must not sign both.
It is important you choose carefully which roll you want to be on. All other people must sign and date in the General panel. If you are physically disabled or overseas the application may be signed on your behalf.

Residential Address

This is your home address. A New Zealand Post Box or rural delivery number isn't enough to describe your address. We require your full home address so we can enrol you in the electorate in which you 'reside'. You "reside" at the place where you choose to make your home because of family or personal relations or for other domestic or personal reasons. Just because you may be occasionally or temporarily absent from that place does not mean that you do not reside there. Being absent from your place of residence because of your employment or education (or your spouse's employment or education) does not affect it either.The most important factor in working out where you reside is where you choose to make your home.

Postal Address

This is needed if your postal address is different from your residential address. We need to write to you to confirm your enrolment.

Occupation

This can also help us distinguish between people who have the same name. It can often appear on the printed roll in a shortened form.

Are you Māori?

Only
New Zealand Māori, or descendants of New Zealand Māori, may answer by ticking the "YES" circle. All other people must tick the "NO" circle.

Phone Numbers

These are needed in case we have to contact you.

Sketch Map

If you live at an un-numbered address, a sketch map showing the location
of your residence is required to assist in establishing your correct electorate.

Have you changed your address recently?

If you've lived at your present residential address for less than one month, please complete these panels.

New Zealanders Overseas

You
must only fill in these panels if you're overseas. Please print when you last lived in New Zealand, when you moved overseas, and the last address you lived at for at least one month before you left New Zealand.

What happens to my signed enrolment form after I've sent it back?

Your registrar of electors will check it is filled in correctly.  If it is, your name will go on the roll of the electorate you have last lived in for at least a month.  We will post you confirmation of your enrolment.

 

Source: elections.org.nz

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